Fake smiles - be gone!

Awkward poses - no more! 

Boring photos - never again!

We're bringing the FUN back to photography!

THE BEST childhood photos are those that make you smile. The ones that want to brurst out of the frame for all the joy and happiness they spark. The ones that show TRUE emotions!

You know what I mean - belly laughs, not stilted half smiles,  armes spread with joy, little feet leaping off the ground, imagination and creativity at their best.

If 'Smile for Mummy!' is not working for you, we've got something else - a mini online photo course that's all about fun


✔️ we'll give you ideas for capturing genuine moments of fun and joy  (and ideas for fun things to try with different kids ages!) 

✔️ we'll give you tips and techniques of how to capture these moments best ( how to use composition and your camera settings for the best impact

✔️ we'll show you how to use body language, colour, props and storytelling to create photos that SCREAM fun

✔️ we'll talk to you about how to be in the moment and notice the loud and quiet joys in your children's lives

✔️ we'll encourage you to get in on the action and get into the photos yourself

 


photographing joy

starts Monday 27th May

AND IT'S FREE!

  • 5 daily lessons covering different ways of capturing the joy of childhood - from colour, movement, body language, light to storytelling, and more! 
  • Support Facebook group so you're never left to your own devices with unanswered questions
  • A CHANCE TO WIN our full flagship online Photography course! JUST for taking part!


Is this for you?

Are you a parent? Do you have a camera? Then the answer is YES

While our full paying courses cover both the technical and more compositional elements, our bootcamps are for anybody, of any ability! 

Because what you could be doing, is capturing photos like these: 


5 more reasons to join us: 


1. HANDS ON LEARNING

Because NOBODY learns just by watching. The format of the bootcamp is very much about having a go - whether you're a complete beginner or further along in your photo journey. Every day will come with a specific photo challenge so you'll know exactly what to focus on - and have some JOYFUL photos to cherish at the end. 

2. PLENTY OF SUPPORT

You will be joining our dedicated FB group where you'll be able to share your photos, get advice, ask for help and get inspired by your fellow bootcampers.

3. BABIES AND BEYOND

Maybe you have a baby, maybe your kids are at school - their smiles, their cuddles still melt your heart - you'll get to photograph both in our bootcamp

4. IT'S FREE!

Free, no charge, gratis, no tie-ins, nothing. We make no mystery of doing this bootcamp to show you how much fun you could have in our 'full' courses but there is absolutely no pressure to sign up! A tasty taster.

5. WIN OUR FLAGSHIP ONLINE COURSE!

Yes, you can win our Flagship online Photography course ( value £229) JUST for taking part. AT the end of the course we will draw a lucky winner who will get their pick of our online courses. It's that simple. 

How to join us:

1. Click on one of the buttons below to be redirected to a registration page

2. Complete the registration  - if you are an existing or past student, you need to enter the email you already have registered with us. If you're new to us, you'll need to set up a learning profile on our site - don;t worry - it's free 🙂 

3. Await confirmation email and get your camera ready for the course start! 

This category includes our current and past students on paying online courses as well as past bootcamp participants - in short those who already have an account registered on our Learning site.

It does NOT include those who just downloaded our freebies or took our self-paced email based courses.

If you're never attended any of our courses ( even if you joined our free email based course) this is a category for you. As part of the registration we will be creating you a brand new account on our learning pages which you'll need to access the material.

lets have some fun!

Register for our Free Photo CLICKstarter course and learn how to start taking control of your camera and take great photos of your kids!

WIN! our 6 week online Photography class!
UPDATED: The winner has been chosen – congrats Claire!

Capturing beautiful and simple images of your baby needn’t be hard and complicated and it doesn’t need to include lots of fussy props. This guide is non-technical and instead focuses on simple instructions you can follow with any camera.

I really really really love Christmas. I cheer up instantly pretty much from the 1st December or as soon as the fairy lights start going up all over the place. They’re such a lovely accent among the doom and gloom of the winter, I really couldn’t be without them.

But photographically speaking – if there is such a thing – they are great because they give you fabulous opportunities to get some beautiful BOKEH.

Bokeh is a real word ( I promise), it comes from Japanese and describes the light circles we can get on our photographs, usually in the background. Like the ones below ( all our students photos).

The great news is that they are actually not difficult to capture and they bring such a lovely festive feel to your photos. Follow our 3 steps and you’ll be bokeh-in all over your photos.

The process:

Before go go any further, make sure your camera is set right:

If you’re shooting on auto: set your camera to Portrait or High Sensitivity.

If you’re shooting in semi-auto or manual mode : set your aperture to the widest available setting ( smallest number you have) and ( unless you;re using tripod or something else where you can just set your camera steady by itself) up your ISO to 800 – 1600 ( or until you’re able to get a shutter speed above 1/60s).

If possible, try to make sure that the subject you’re photographing is facing a window or another source of light.

To make bokeh as attractive and as effective as possible, we are essentially trying to throw them out of focus as much as possible. And here is your 3 step plan to achieve it.

Step 1. Distance to the lights

The closer your lights are to your subject, the more in focus they will be. So to give yourself a chance of getting it right, move your subject a little distance from the lights.

xmasbokeh-page-1

Step 2. Distance to your subject.

The further you are from the point you are focusing on, the more everything in the frame will be in focus. Easy way to test it – grab your camera and hold one arm in front of your lens. Take a picture focusing on your hand. Now without moving an inch from where you are or changing anything on your camera, focus on something a bit further away. If you compare the two pictures, you’ll see that one has comparatively much more blur in the background than the other.

xmasbokeh-page-2

 

Step 3. Zoom in

The more you zoom in on your subject, the more you compress the entire space in your frame ( trust us on it) and the more your lights will be thrown out of focus. So use as much zoom as you can in the space you’re in – longer zoom will require you to be physically further away from your subject or it won’t let you focus. Yes, I know in the step above we made a point of saying – get close to your subject – this means, get as close as you can with your zoom stretched out. Try to zoom in so much that your subject occupies at least half the space in the frame.

xmasbokeh-page-3

 

 

 

 

IN SUMMARY

1. Get your subject away from the lights

2. Get close to your subject

3. Zoom in on your subject

Good luck and a very happy Christmas from The Photography for Parents team!

Feast your eyes on more wonderful examples of bokeh from our students!

 

 

 

We often get asked about some of these in class so we decided to compile a little “cheat sheet” to the most essential and commonly used ( or misunderstood) photography related acronyms. You can download the pretty file in pdf format from the link below and if you like it, don’t hesitate to let us know – we have a few more in the pipeline!

12 Essential Photography Acronyms

 

DSLR : stands for –  Digital Single Lens Reflex camera

WHAT IT MEANS –  Single Lens Reflex camera describes a camera where the light travels through a single lens and then is reflected by a pop up mirror, which relays the image to your viewfinder. It specifies it is a Single lens reflex camera to distinguish it from Twin lens reflex cameras developed around the same time. SLRs describe e general type of a camera, DSLR are SLRs that use a digital sensor in lieu of film.

AE : stands for –  Automatic Exposure

WHAT IT MEANS – The camera measures the light reflected off the object or scene you are pointing it at and automatically adjusts all its parameters :  the aperture, shutter speed and light sensitivity as well as whether or not to fire off the flash to take a correctly exposed photograph.

AF / MF : stands for –  Auto Focus / Manual Focus

WHAT IT MEANS – Auto focus refers to the camera’s and the lens’ capability to achieve sharp focus on a selected part of the picture using a sensor, a control system and a motor. Some lenses will allow you to switch between auto mode and manual mode, some offer only manual focus (often the case with older legacy lenses).

A ( or Av) : stands for –  Aperture priority

WHAT IT MEANS – Aperture priority is a semi-automatic camera mode which allows the photographer to select a desired aperture value and let the camera adjust the rest of the settings to achieve a correctly exposed photo. Aperture values are responsible for how much of the image will be in sharp focus and how much will be blurred and out of focus.

WB : stands for –  White Balance

WHAT IT MEANS – White balance refers to a camera setting responsible for adjusting the colour temperature of the photo to achieve a photo with the most natural looking colours (without orange, blue or green-ish tinge). Settings include : sunny, cloudy, flash, tungsten, fluorescent etc. There is also a possibility to adjust white balance based on Kalvin temperature scale.

DOF : stands for –  Depth of Field

WHAT IT MEANS – Depth of Field refers to an area in the scene we are trying to photograph, which will appear in sharp focus on the finished photo. Where only a small area of the scene appears in focus (and what is located behind and/or in front of it is blurred) we talk about “shallow depth of field”.

Exif : stands for –  Exchangeable Image File Format

WHAT IT MEANS –  Exif is a standardised system used to encode information on the parameters of the photo taken (date/time, camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO speed, metering mode, focal length, copyright etc ) onto the photo file itself, allowing you to review this data either in your camera or once uploaded onto a computer.

ISO : stands for –  literal acronym: International Organisation of Standardisation,

WHAT IT MEANS –  In photography ISO refers to a measure of light sensitivity. ISO values typically range from 100 to 16 500 and beyond and determines the level of light sensitivity of your camera. Lower values are used where a good quantity of light is available (daylight photos outside) and the higher range is used to compensate for worse light (indoor photos in poorer light).

S (or Tv) : stands for –  Shutter Speed Priority

WHAT IT MEANS –  A semi automatic camera mode where the photographer sets the desired shutter speed value and lets the camera adjust the rest of the settings (aperture, ISO) accordingly to achieve a correct exposure. Expressed in fractions of a second, the smaller the fraction, the faster you are able to take the photo and capture movement.

P : stands for –  Program mode

WHAT IT MEANS –   A more complex automatic exposure mode. It sets the aperture and shutter speed automatically but still allows you to change some of the settings such as whether or not you want the flash to pop up or what ISO setting to select.

M : stands for –  Manual mode

WHAT IT MEANS –  A fully manual camera mode which allows the photographer to set every single camera parameter based on their needs. The photographer manually selects the aperture value, the shutter speed and the ISO value as well as whether or not to use flash.

RAW ( not an acronym, but often used like one)

WHAT IT MEANS –  Often thought to be an acronym, Raw file format refers to a picture file which is preserved by the camera “as shot” – without processing it or compressing into a more portable format such as jpg. Shooting in Raw will require from you to have photo processing software capable of working with this format.

 

Download pdf